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Execution Then and Now December 19, 2006

Posted by larrylaz in Links, Random Musings.
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Joe,

I trust you caught a bit of the story last week about the man in Florida whose execution by lethal injection was “botched”. Apparently they had to give him a second dose of the injection and it took around twenty minutes longer than it should have for him to die. If you’ve got no idea what I am talking about, here’s a short summary of the story. In a nutshell,

“Executions in Florida normally take no more than about 15 minutes, with the inmate rendered unconscious and motionless within three to five minutes. But Diaz appeared to be moving 24 minutes after the first injection, grimacing, blinking, licking his lips, blowing and appearing to mouth words…

Diaz’s attorney, Suzanne Myers Keffler, reacted angrily to the findings. ‘This is complete negligence on the part of the state,’ she said. ‘When he was still moving after the first shot of chemicals, they should have known there was a problem and they shouldn’t have continued. This shows a complete disregard for Mr. Diaz. This is disgusting.'”

Reading about this story gave me a greater appreciation for Christ’s agony on the Cross. I don’t mean to get into a debate about capital punishment and its’ place in our society. But what amazed me is that there were many people who were indignant with the state of Florida for screwing this up as they did. They regard it as a violation of human dignity to be put to death in such a way that the person may have experienced some discomfort or pain for a half an hour before he died.

Yet what a contrast was the relatively peaceful death of Angel Diaz when set against the brutal execution of the Son of God. Diaz may have suffered a little bit for a half an hour. Christ suffered in agony for six hours, after having been publicly beaten with rods, spit upon, mocked and totally shamed. Witnesses of capital punishment today cannot even speak during the execution. Yet those who witnessed the death of Christ heaped scorn and insult upon Him, taking the highest of pleasures in His awful death.

So I was reminded last week of the great cost of our salvation. Christ not only died for our sins, but He was executed in the most cruel, painful way that has ever been devised, a thousand times worse than what is called inhumane today. What would human rights activists have said that day if the had been at Calvary?

Larry

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